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Feds release plan for LNG port and pipeline in southwest Oregon

Speak up for renewable energy in Oregon!

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Southern Oregon faces a new, dangerous project that will send fossil fuels from Russia, the Middle East and Indonesia into California. In September, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project in southwest Oregon. The multi-national energy corporations (Williams, PG&E and Fort Chicago Energy Partners) that are pushing the proposal want to import more foreign fossil fuels at the expense of the environment, private property and national security.

The Jordan Cove/Pacific Connector proposal would build a LNG port in Coos Bay and a 230-mile pipeline across Coos, Douglas, Jackson and Klamath counties to serve the voracious California market. The pipeline would cross two mountain ranges, five major rivers (including the Rogue), hundreds of streams containing imperiled salmon and 72 miles of public forests, clearcutting hundreds of acres of reserves for endangered species and condemn private property along nearly 150 miles. The plan, which threatens water quality, endangered species and the safety of adjacent communities, has a DEIS that is riddled with holes and inadequacies.
 
According to a May 2008 report from the Oregon Department of Energy, Oregon's natural gas needs could be adequately met by natural gas from North America. LNG costs more than natural gas and has a much larger carbon footprint because it requires liquefaction, transportation across an ocean, and regasification before being available to consumers on the west Coast. In contrast, we could transport natural gas from Canada or the Rockies to meet our needs while investing in green energy like solar and wind.

For more information on LNG and clean energy solutions, visit the Ratepayers for Affordable, Clean Energy website at www.lngpollutes.org.

Perhaps the core issue is that this proposal would increase our dependence on global warming fossil fuels imported from some nations that don’t like the U.S. very much. This is an environmental, economic, safety and national security issue. Rather than throw more public resources at finite fossil fuel infrastructure, it is time to fully invest in green energy. LNG is just a scheme for big corporations to get richer at the expense of our atmosphere and our communities.

We must stand up to FERC before they give energy companies a green light. KS Wild and our allies throughout Oregon are picking this DEIS apart and will be submitting detailed comments on the plan. We are closely following this process so that the public and our natural resources are given a voice in the implementation of U.S. energy policy. In the next couple of weeks, we could use your help.

Take Action: FERC is accepting public comments through December 4, 2008. Please take a few minutes to weigh in on this important topic.


You may file your comments via mail to the Commission by sending an original and two copies of your letter to:

Kimberly Bose, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
888 First St., NE, Room 1A
Washington, DC 20426

IMPORTANT: Label one copy of the comments for the attention of Gas Branch 3, PJ-11.3. Mail your comments promptly, so that they will be received in Washington, DC on or before December 4, 2008.

Electronic filing: You can electronically submit comments via FERC’s “Quick Comment” website at www.ferc.gov. It is not terribly easy, so be patient, or snail mail it the traditional way!

Sample letter:


Kimberly Bose, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
888 First St., NE, Room 1A
Washington, DC 20426

Re: Docket numbers CP07-441-000 and CP07-444-000

Dear Ms. Bose,

I am writing to oppose the Jordan Cove/Pacific Connecter LNG project in southwest Oregon. The DEIS is an inadequate document that proposes major impacts on our natural resources, our safety and our future. FERC is proceeding with a dangerous proposal and I implore you to represent the interests of the American people, not a few energy corporations, and redirect public resources to renewable energy projects.

The basic premise in the “purpose and need” is flawed. According to a May 2008 report from the Oregon Department of Energy, Oregon's natural gas needs could be adequately met by natural gas from North America. LNG costs more than natural gas and has a much larger carbon footprint because it requires liquefaction, transportation across an ocean, and regasification before being available to consumers on the west Coast. In contrast, we could transport natural gas from Canada or the Rockies to meet our needs while investing in green energy like solar and wind. It is irresponsible to make America more reliant on foreign fossil fuels when we should be investing our resources in sustainable, renewable energy sources here in the U.S.

The proposed horizontal directional drilling under the Rogue River is a serious threat to our water quality. The salmon fisheries of the Umpqua, Rogue and Klamath watersheds are already struggling to survive and adding to the cumulative effects of dams, diversions, pollution, development and climate change, this proposal unnecessarily threatens our fish and our water.

The reality is that we have reached the end of an era. The writing is on the wall. The age of fossil fuels should be over. I implore you to choose the "no action" alternative to stop this LNG proposal immediately and redirect public funds to a complete investment in renewable, clean energy sources.

Thank you,

For more information on LNG and clean energy solutions, visit the Ratepayers for Affordable, Clean Energy website at www.lngpollutes.org.